How to Knit Single or Odd Numbered Row Stripe Pattern Without Cutting Yarns.

When you knit a single / odd numbered-row stripe pattern in flat knitting, you keep having to cut the yarn and re-join the new colours. I don’t really like having lots of strands to tidy at the end.

This meant that I never really designed any flat-knitting-style pattern with single / odd numbered stripes. BUT things are now changing!!!!!

I have discovered the way to knit a single / odd numbered stripe patterns without cutting the yarn and rejoining the new colours using circular needles and today I will show you how this can be done.

Following is the basic rule to this technique:

  • 1) It only applies to flat knitting (and not circular).
  • 2) You need a circular needle to make this happen.
  • 3) When the colour of the yarn you want to knit on the next row is NOT at the beginning of the next row (i.e. still at the beginning of the previous row), pull the needle to the left all the way to the other end of the circular needle. This means that you may knit the Right or  Wrong side row more than once – so keep an eye on the row count.

Here is how to do it.

Step 1: Knit 1 row with colour 1 (in this case, pink) (pic below).

how to knit a single or odd numbered stripe pattern without cutting the yarn

Step 2: The next colour I want to knit is green. But this green yarn is not at the beginning of the next row (i.e. still at the beginning of the previous row (on the right). So I pull the needle to the left. Hold the fabric and move all the way to the other end of the needle facing the right (pic below).

how to knit a single or odd numbered stripe pattern without cutting the yarn

Pic below shows where all the stitches have moved to the other end of the needle, which is facing the right.

how to knit a single or odd numbered stripe pattern without cutting the yarn

You can now knit with the green yarn without having to cut and re-joining (pic below).

how to knit a single or odd numbered stripe pattern without cutting the yarn and rejoining

Notice that when you work the green yarn, you have knitted the RS row again (pic below).

how to knit a single or odd numbered stripe pattern without cutting the yarn

Step 3: The next row I want to knit is pink. This time, the pink yarn is already at the beginning of the next row, which means that you can work the next row straight away without pulling the needle (pic below).

how to knit a single or odd numbered stripe pattern without cutting the yarn

Step 4: After working one row (or an odd number of the row) with pink, I now want to knit the next colour with green. But the green yarn is not at the beginning of the next row (i.e.still at the beginning of the previous row). So I pull the needle all the way to the other end.

how to knit a single or odd numbered stripe pattern without cutting the yarn

Work the WS row again but without cutting the yarn (pic below).

knit_single_stripe_9

That’s it.

Using this technique, you can do various combinations of rows in stripe patterns as well as colours. I experimented with single garter pattern using this technique and I really like how the pattern looks – it’s retro!

single stripe garter stitch

Below is the video tutorial on this technique πŸ™‚ Happy stripe knitting!

Responses to “How to Knit Single or Odd Numbered Row Stripe Pattern Without Cutting Yarns.”

  1. Pili

    That looks like a very ingenious technique! I’m sure other knitters will appreciate it very much!

    • Kyoko

      Hehe! When I figured it out, I was like “woo hoo! I don’t have to cut the yarn anymore!” LOL.
      It’s so amazing that a simple craft like knitting, there are so much to discover!
      Happy week!
      *hugs*
      Kyoko

  2. rondy

    This makes so much sense and I can’t thank you enough for printing this info, I can’t wait to use your technique on my next project. I love single row stripes and have always worked with four balls, two of each color and ran the braid up the sides. This seems so much better.

    • Kyoko

      Hi Rondy!
      yay! I am so happy that this technique is useful. Me too, I love single stripe patterns and it’s interesting to know that you have used 4 balls of wool. That also makes sense! πŸ˜€ So much fun and so much to knit! Thank you for your comment πŸ˜‰
      x
      Kyoko

  3. Excellent tip, Kyoko–my thanks! I will use this in a project very soon.

    • Kyoko

      Hi Beth!
      Thank you very much πŸ˜€ I have now conquered my fear of single stripe knitting! πŸ˜‰
      Happy weekend!
      x
      Kyoko

  4. elenor

    Thank you for sharing this clever idea and the excellent explanations and pictures!
    I always love to read your posts. Great blog – congratulations!
    HAve a good time.

    • Kyoko

      Hi Elenor,
      Thank you very much for your lovely comment. Look forward to your visits πŸ˜€
      Happy weekend knitting!
      x
      Kyoko

  5. Mary

    Hi Kyoko!

    Thanks for this tutorial. This method is so clever.

    Mary

    • Kyoko

      Hi Mary,
      Thank you – it’s kind of cool finding new methods of knitting. It opens a whole new world!
      x
      Kyoko

  6. judit

    CLEVER!!!!

    • Kyoko

      Thank you! πŸ˜‰
      x
      Kyoko

  7. Cindy

    Cool trick. It would work with double pointed needles too, right?

    • Kyoko

      Hi Cindy,
      Thank you for the comment. Absolutely right. It wold also work with DPN. πŸ™‚
      x
      Kyoko

  8. Kim

    This is a fantastic idea. Thank you for sharing.

  9. Cheryl Brake

    How are you knitting one row, knitting the next row and still coming up with stockinette stitch?

    • Kyoko

      Hi Cheryl,
      You would be sliding the circular needle onto the other side to work the next colour.
      So basically you are just working the knit row twice. Hope it makes sense!
      Best,
      Kyoko

  10. Donna

    Ingenious! I am so happy you posted this, the worse part of knitting stripe is all the weaving at the end. Thanks so much sharing this method.

    • Kyoko

      Thank you so much for your comment!
      x
      Kyoko

  11. Joyce

    As I see it, there is no purling in this method. Is that right?
    Only knitting each way, each color

    • Kyoko

      Yep, you are exactly right!
      πŸ˜€
      x
      Kyoko

  12. Nicole

    Brilliant! This makes so much sense that I’m tempted to start a new flat, striped project, just to play with this technique.

    • Kyoko

      Thank you for your comment! πŸ˜€

  13. Altaviese

    Amaze! Thanks for posting.

    • Kyoko

      Thank you for your comment!

  14. margaret

    that is so so clever. I will be using that method in future. Also I will try knitting the way you do. I tend to wrap the wool round my right fingers using the index finger to wrap wool round needle. Your method looks so much easier

    • Kyoko

      Hi Margaret,
      Thank you for your comment! It sounds like you knit English method. I knot continental method where I hold the working yarn on my left. If you can knit both ways you can do fair isle pattern very quickly!
      x
      Kyoko

  15. Vladjenka

    Very nice tutorial… I found that it is even better to work with double pointed needles… that way you just turn the work and don’t need to pull the work from one needle to another. Although when knitting a larger project, the stitches don’t always fit on DPNs, becouse they are too short. So this tutorial will be useful for me… I didn’t actually think of knitting straight project on circular needles before πŸ˜‰ So thanks and keep up the good work ♥

    • Kyoko

      What a fab idea for using DPNs. I so agree. For a small flat projects DPNs would be good.
      Thank you for the comment!
      x
      Kyoko

  16. jen

    How do you cast on with the 2 colors?

    thanks!

    • Kyoko

      Hi Jen!
      For this method, you only cast on using 1 colour then work with different colours.
      It is possible to cast on using 2 colours using various techniques.
      x
      Kyoko

  17. Marny CA

    Wonderful! Thank you very much!

    I thought I did something similar with a baby hat – but I started a new color, leaving tails.

    Those tails wound up as fringe when the hat rim was folded up! I think 1/2″ long is the length I cut the yarn when done.

    Came out really cute!

    I am definitely going to give your method a whirl!! Amazing!! TY!

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