Knitting Tutorial: How to Knit Perpendicular (Out of Fabric / 3D Knitting)

knitting perpendicular

Knitting perpendicular

Why? – you may ask me. Well, it might come in handy some day! :D  I used this technique for my new pattern which is coming out before the Harrogate Knitting & Stitching Show. I know you will all love it :D

When you want to knit perpendicular (out of fabric or 3D knitting), normally you would pick up stitches afterward (fig. 1). If you want to pick up stitches exactly straight across the row, this can be a little tricky especially if you didn’t mark the position (yes, I have done this so many times).

Fig. 1

Fig. 1

When I was a university student, my lecturer used to say to us “be prepared for anything”. Since then my life is all about preparation and I have devised an alternative method for perpendicular / 3D knitting.

ADVANTAGE:

  • It prepares the stitches before hand (so you don’t need to pick them up later)
  • It gives the stitches at an exact position precisely without picking them up later. This will reduce the risk of picking the wrong stitches.

POSSIBLE DISADVANTAGE

  • You may not know how many stitches you would like at the time.
  • You would have to rest the stitches until they are used.

INFORMATION: I have 20 sts and I would like to knit the centre 10 sts perpendicular (i.e. have 5 sts on either sides).

You are at a row which you would like to knit perpendicular later on (in my case after 10th row). If you are knitting flat, this should be at WS row. If you are knitting in circle you can do this on the RS.

Work up to a stitch where you will be knitting in perpendicular (in my case p5) (fig. 2).

Fig. 2.

Fig. 2.

For flat knitting, *p1, p1tbl into the same st (fig. 3). Repeat from * for a desired number of stitches (in my case 10 times).

For circular knitting, *k1, k1tbl into the same st. Repeat from * for a desired number of stitches (in my case 10 times).

Fig. 3

Fig. 3

You should now have double the amount of sts to knit perpendicular (for example, I want 10 sts to knit perpendicular so I now have 20 sts) (fig. 4).

Fig. 4

Fig. 4

Turn the work. Knit until you encounter the increased sts which you have made in the previous row (in my case k5).

For flat knitting, knit this stitch as usual (fig. 5) then thread the waste yarn into the next stitch. Drop this stitch (it will not unravel because there is a waste yarn through it (fig. 6).

Fig. 5

Fig. 5

Fig. 6

Fig. 6

Repeat this process again: *k1, thread the next st with waste yarn and drop this stitch. Repeat from * until you have worked all the increased sts (i.e. in my case 20 sts). You can now see that you are back with the original number of sts and the increased sts are transferred onto the waste yarn (fig. 7).

Fig. 7

Fig. 7

Note: You will always have to knit the stitches made tbl and thread the ordinary stitch onto a waste yarn. So for circular knitting, this means you would have to thread the stitch first, then knit the next stitch.

Continue to work up to the desired length. Cast off.

When you are ready to knit perpendicular, insert the needle into the loops and pull the waste yarn away. If you are knitting with a pair of knitting needles, insert the needle from the left (fig. 8).

Fig. 8

Fig. 8

Join yarn and continue knitting perpendicular. Tidying the end is easy. Just thread into the WS of the work and tie a knot (fig. 9).

Fig. 9

Fig. 9

I have made a video tutorial of this if you are interested…(don’t like hearing my own voice tho!!).

SUGGESTED USE:

Plush – e.g. bird’s wing, animal ears…

Decoration on a jupmer

Flaps on a glove etc.

Enjoy! :D

Responses to “Knitting Tutorial: How to Knit Perpendicular (Out of Fabric / 3D Knitting)”

  1. stephanie

    You are amazing. Simply amazing. Thank you for sharing this. I can’t wait until I get better at knitting so I can use some of your techniques. I so desperately want to knit the baby cardigan. :)

    • kyoko

      Hi Stephanie,
      Thank you so much for the kind words :D Once you start knitting lots, you won’t be able to stop! :D
      x
      Kyoko

  2. Pili

    You are amazing Kyoko!

    I have to say I haven’t knitted in a lifetime, but I sure know where to find great tutorials if I decide to go back to it!

    Hope you’re having a great week!

    • kyoko

      Hi Pili!
      Thank you :D Oh, you have to start knitting. It is so fun – you can make things for G and C!
      You have a great wee to you too.

      x
      Kyoko

  3. 3D knitting?

    Oh, my.

    My brain might implode… but like you say, you never know when you might need it!!

    • kyoko

      Hehe! It may come in handy you see :D. I was thinking that I could make a penguin with a flap or crazy jumper with lots of flaps coming out. LOL!
      x
      Kyoko

  4. Tracy

    Excellent tutorial, Kyoko! It’s been a while since I’ve knit like this… so a refresher is always a good thing! Happy week, my friend :o) ((HUGS))

    • kyoko

      Hi Tracy!
      Thank you :) I haven’t done a tutorial for such a long time so it was really nice to do one. I have been so busy in the past few months and I kept thinking that I have to do one. So it was nice to get one tutorial done.
      Hope you have a productive week! ;)
      x
      kyoko

  5. Anita

    I’m not sure right now what I would use it for, but I’ll think of something. VERY clever!

    • kyoko

      Hi Anita!
      hehe:! :D Hope this tutorial comes to you mind when you are knitting something. ;)
      x
      Kyoko

  6. Auggy

    Rather late, but I wanted to say, this is a great tutorial – I’ve been contemplating how to do this best for adding a flap to some fingerless gloves so I’m glad I happened upon this. One question though: you say that “You will always have to knit the stitches made tbl and thread the ordinary stitch onto a waste yarn”… can you explain why? Thanks!

    • Kyoko

      Hello!
      Thanks for the comment. I love fingerless gloves with flaps. They are so useful.
      OK the reason for threading the ordinary stitches is mainly due to how it looks at the end. So the stitches made tbl will always stay behind the threaded stitches which you will work later. If you thread the stitches made tbl the fabric does not look continuous. Does this make sense? Any questions, feel free to message me :D
      Happy knitting!
      x
      Kyoko

      • Auggy

        Thanks! I thought it might be something like that – to keep the material more even looking – but wasn’t sure and didn’t want to just make something up! Thanks again for the info and the great tutorial!

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